Bhai Sadharan

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Guru Amar Das

Part of a series on
Manji System

Bhai Allah Yaar
Bhai Beni
Bhai Bua
Bhai Darbari
Bhai Gangu Shah
Bhai Handal
Bhai Kedari
Bhai Kheda
Bhai Lalu
Bhai Mahesha
Bhai Mai Das
Bhai Manak Chand (Manji)
Bhai Murari
Bhai Paro
Bhai Phera
Bhai Raja Ram
Bhai Rang Das
Bhai Rang Shah
Bhai Sadharan
Bhai Sawan Mall
Bhai Sukhan
Bibi Sachan Sach


Pb2.jpg

GuruAmardas Handal.jpg

Guru Amar Das

<b>Part of a series on
Manji System

Bhai Allah Yaar
Bhai Beni
Bhai Bua
Bhai Darbari
Bhai Gangu Shah
Bhai Handal
Bhai Kedari
Bhai Kheda
Bhai Lalu
Bhai Mahesha
Bhai Mai Das
Bhai Manak Chand (Manji)
Bhai Murari
Bhai Paro
Bhai Phera
Bhai Raja Ram
Bhai Rang Das
Bhai Rang Shah
Bhai Sadharan
Bhai Sawan Mall
Bhai Sukhan
Bibi Sachan Sach


Pb2.jpg

Sadharan, or Sādhāraṇ, (1504-1598?) is said to have been born in Fatehabad, near Goindwal Sahib. He and Bhai Lehna were two of the finest disciples of Sāhib Srī Guru Nanak Dev who studied at Kartarpur Sahib (now in Pakistan). The Jansakhis do give a checkered account of Sadhāraṇ and his family. Guru Nanak Dev would only dine in his household, and that Sadharan would spin and weave the fabric worn by the first Sikh guru, 'Sāhib Srī Guru Nanak Dev. There is an account of an exchange of Guru Sahib with the mother of Sādhāraṇ. After 'Sāhib Srī Guru Nanak Dev anointed Bhai Lehna as 'Sāhib Srī Guru Angad Dev and sending him to Khadoor Sahib, Sādhāraṇ was made the head or caretaker of Kartarpur Sahib. Sadhāraṇ was the only confidant of 'Sāhib Srī Guru Nanak Dev during his last days.

After Baba Sri Chand asserted his claim over Kartarpur, Sādhāraṇ shifted to Khadoor Sahib to be with his gurubhai (classmate) and now second Sikh guru, 'Sāhib Srī Guru Angad Dev. Sādhāraṇ's prominent role in the early days of the second guru's reign is also marked in the janamsakhis. When the delegation that included Bhai Budda reached Khadoor Sahib, they knocked at the door of Bhai Sādhāraṇ. The janamsakhis record that Bhai Sādhāraṇ had everyone sing So-dar in the evening and Asa-di-vār in the morning before informing them of the second guru's meditation place. Bhai Sādhāraṇ, who was a calligrapher, architect, sculptor, warrior (axe) and musician, had an extraordinary repertoire of Guru Nanak's original Gurbāṇī Kīrtan repertoire.

Bhai Sādhāraṇ played an important role in the construction of Baoli Sahib, hand-carving the kāṭha-dī-pauṛī, subsequent to which, Sāhib Srī Guru Amar Das endowed the title Sant Sādhāraṇ and the sewa of one of 22 Manjis. He also played a major role in the construction of the Ramdaspuri during the tenure of the fourth Sikh guru. The last reported sewa done by Sant Sādhāraṇ was at the time of Sahib Sri Guru Arjan Dev when he (Guru Sahib) sent the octogenarian Sikh elder to overlook the construction at Kartarpur Sahib. He lived his final days at Baba Bakala.

Bhai Sahib Das, a direct descendant of Sant Sādhāraṇ, was a childhood friend and close aide of the tenth Sikh guru, Sahib Sri Guru Gobind Singh. Sahib Das was initiated into the Khalsa Order by the tenth guru himself and renamed Bhai Sahib Singh. Sahib Singh had played a major role in the construction of all of the forts at Anandpur Sahib and remained at the 10th guru's side.

Bhai Mehtab Singh (early 19th century) was a direct descendant of Bhai Sādhāraṇ and Bhai Sāhib Das. He did not enter into any treaty with the British and continued to lead the resistance losing all his holdings and wealth in the process. Bhai Mehtab Singh, as part of the Panthic efforts to protect this vital memory bearer and Gursikh pedagogue, then moved to Saidpur (Ṭhaṭṭā Ṭibbā) in the erstwhile kingdom of Kapurthala at the invitation of the Maharaja. His son, Bhai Tehel Singh, famously know as Bhai Panjab Singh continued to lead the resistance singing Panj-padārthī Asā-dī-vār's playing his saraṅdā from sunset to sunrise. He had two sons, Bhai Mal Singh and Bhai Devā Singh (also Diwān Singh, d. 1894 AD). Bhai Devā Singh was also an outstanding singer with a repertoire of Gurbāṇī Sangīta that represented his ancestor's association with all ten gurus, and played the peacock shaped instrument Tāūs. Bhai Devā Singh had 5 sons: Bhai Narain Singh (d. 1906 at Bar, 5 miles from Nankana Sahib), Sundar Singh (married but died young), Sawan Singh, Bhai Jwāla Singh of Ṭhaṭṭā Ṭibbā (1872-1952), and Pala Singh (died young at about 12-13 years of age).

Bhai Narain Singh's sewā when the plague struck was legendary. He lived on horseback serving thousands of people - treating them and doing the final rites of those who succumbed. Sadly, he also contracted the decease insppite of all the precautions he was asked to keep. He was an outstanding singer as well, played the Tāūs, and had 4 pakhāwajis to accompany him. Gyāni Bhagat Singh (1897-1986) was his only child who lived long and had a family. Bhagat Singh's sons were the first from the area to get higher education inspiring others from the area to take up higher studies. Bhagat Singh also participated in the freedom struggle and was along with his uncle, Bhai Sahib Jwala Singh, at the Jaito-da-Morcha. Bhagat Singh had 7 sons and 2 daughters: Sardar Hardeep Singh PCS (1926-1975), Harbhajan Singh (d. 1999), Amarjit Singh (1931-2004), Amrik Singh (1931-2019), Jeet Kaur, Hardial Singh IAS (1934), Sarup Kaur, Raghbir Singh, and Capt. Balwant Singh. Bhai Baldeep Singh is the youngest son of Amarjit Singh who renounced a promising flying pilot career in the Indian Air Force in 1990 at age 20 to pioneer the revival of Gurbāṇī Saṅgīta.

The legendary Bhai Sahib Bhai Jwala Singh was at the forefront of the freedom struggle. He had three prominent sons: Bhai Gurcharan Singh Ragi (1915-2017), Bhai Avtar Singh Ragi (1926-2006), and Headmaster Gurdial Singh. Bhai Kultar Singh Ragi is the youngest son of Bhai Avtar Singh.