Sahibzada Fateh Singh

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Sahibzada Zorawar Singh and Fateh Singh in captivity


Fateh Singh, Sahibzada (1699-1705), the youngest of Guru Gobind Singh's four sons, was born to Mata Jito ji (also known as Mata Sundari ji) at Anandpur on 12 December 1699. After the death of his mother, on 5 December 1700, he was brought up under the care of his grandmother, Mata Gujari Kaur ji, with whom he remained till the last.

On 26 December 1705, he was martyred at Sirhind along with his elder brother, Zorawar Singh. He is probably the youngest recorded martyr in history who knowingly laid down his life at the very tender age of 5 years. Sahibzada Fateh Singh and his older brother, Sahibzada Zorawar Singh are among the most hallowed martyrs in Sikhism.

A combination of Mughals and hillmen besieged Anandpur Sahib on the orders of emperor Aurangzeb. The stock of food in the town ran out. The Mughals promised to leave the Sikhs alone if they would hand over the fortress of Anandpur. To this Guru Gobind agreed and left the town with his family and a small band of retainers.

They had not gone very far when the Mughals, breaking their promise, came after them. Guru Gobind entrusted his two younger sons, Zorawar Singh and Fateh Singh as well as his mother, Mata Gujri, to the care of a cook in his household named Gangu.

Gangu brought Mata Gujri and the two Sahibzadas to his native village of Sahedi. Bribed by the Mughals, he turned over the three members of Guru Gobind's family to the faujdar of Morinda. They were then brought to Sirhind in the presence of Wazir Khan, the Nawab of Sirhind.

The two sons of Guru Gobind, Zorawar (9 years old) and Fateh (6 years old) were offered safe passage if they became Muslims. With a courage that belied their years, both boys refused to do so.

Wazir Khan sentenced them to death. They were bricked alive.

Although he did not know it then, but Wazir Khan was to pay for the crime that he had committed. After Guru Gobind's death, Madhodas Bairagi, a hermit from Nanded, whom the Guru baptised as Banda Bahadur, besieged the Punjab. After laying waste, the cities of Samana and Sandhaura, he moved towards Sirhind and after defeating the Mughal forces, killed Wazir Khan.

The place where the two sons of Guru Gobind were bricked alive is today known as Fatehgarh Sahib.


See also:


These articles deal with Char Sahibzade

Sahibzada Ajit Singh -|- Sahibzada Jujhar Singh -|- Sahibzada Zorawar Singh -|- Sahibzada Fateh Singh

References

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  • 1. Sainapati, Kavi, Sri Guru Sobhd. Patiala, 1967.
  • 2. Chibar, Kesar Singh, Bansdvalindmd Dnsdn Pdtshdhidn Kd. Chandigarh, 1972.
  • 3. Sukha Singh, Bhai, Gurbilds Dnsvin Pdlshdiu. Lahore, 1912.
  • 4. Paclam, Piaia Singh, Char Sdhibidde. Patiala, 1967.
  • 5. Trilochan Singh, Life-sketch of Guru Gobind Singh. Chandigarh, 1968.