ECHR Mann Singh Decision

From SikhiWiki
Jump to: navigation, search

English translation by Google

EUROPEAN COURT OF HUMAN RIGHTS 845 27.11.2008

Released by the Registrar

DECISION TO INADMISSIBILITY C. MANN SINGH FRANCE

A panel of the European Court of Human Rights has declared inadmissible the application in case Mann Singh v. France (Application No. 24479/07). (The decision is in French.)

The complainant

The complainant, Shingara Mann Singh, is a French national born in 1956 (is now 52 years old) and residing in Sarcelles (France).

Summary of facts

The case relates to the obligation to appear "naked head and face on the photographs for driving licenses and, consequently, the prohibition on a Sikh practice of appearing with his turban on photos identity to be affixed on his license.

The applicant is a practising Sikh. The Sikh religion requires members to wear turbans at all times. Holds a license for ordinary vehicles and trucks, he won the renewal of its license for the last category of vehicles in 1987, 1992 and 1998 by producing photographs of identity where he appeared wearing of turban.

Victim of a robbery during which his license was stolen, he asked the issuance of a duplicate document to the prefecture of the Val d'Oise on 30 April 2004. His request was denied because he was wearing a turban on identity photographs produced.

On 25 October 2004, he repeated his request in writing to the prefecture, asked who was dismissed on 26 November 2004 for the same reason.

On 24 January 2005, he appealed to the Administrative Tribunal of Cergy-Pontoise to cancel the decision of 26 November 2004 and get the selection issue of duplicate call.

On 27 January 2005, it also takes the court a request for interim relief requesting the suspension of the execution of the decision.

By order of 11 February 2005, the judge rejected his request. On 28 February 2005, the complainant pourvut appealed against that order. By a decision of 5 December 2005, the State Council canceled the order and suspended the decision, saying it lacked legal basis because it was based on a circular dated 21 June 1999 on the affixing of identity photographs on identity documents and travel, residence permits and driving licenses taken by the Ministry of Interior, incompetent authority to establish such a requirement for issuing driving licenses. The State Council ordered the prefecture of the Val d'Oise to review the applicant's request.

On 6 December 2005, the Minister of Transport, Equipment, Tourism and Maritime Affairs sent a circular to prefects No. 2005-80 on the application of identity photographs on driver's licenses, requiring the production of A photograph on which the head of the person must be "naked and face" for issuing the document or a duplicate.

On 16 January 2006, after reviewing the applicant's position, the prefecture of the Val d'Oise made a decision denying him again issuing duplicate driver's license based on the new circular.

On 6 February 2006, the complainant and the association "United Sikhs," captures the State Council to appeal for abuse of authority for cancellation of the circular of 6 December 2005, and a request for interim measures the suspension of its execution.

By order of 6 March 2006, the Council of State rejected their request for interim relief.

On 15 March 2006, he appealed to the Administrative Tribunal of Cergy-Pontoise to cancel the decision of 16 January 2006 denying the issuance of duplicate driver's license and obtain the prefecture to issue the document.

By a ruling of 14 December 2006, the Administrative Court joined the petitions to annul the decisions of refusal on 26 November 2004 and 16 January 2006, quashed those decisions and ordered the prefecture to review the applicant's request. The Minister of Transport, Equipment, Tourism and Maritime Affairs appealed the ruling on the refusal of 16 January 2006 before the Administrative Court of Appeal of Versailles. Moreover, its application has not been reviewed by the prefecture, he appealed to the Administrative Court of Appeal a request for assistance in implementing the ruling of 14 December 2006 request was rejected.

By a ruling of 15 December 2006, the Council of State rejected the appeal for judicial review against the circular of 6 December 2005, ruling that the challenged provisions, which seek to limit the risks of fraud or falsification of driver's license, allowing for the identification document in question as certain as possible of the person it represents, are neither inappropriate nor disproportionate to this objective. He added that the fact that in the past, the production of photographs wearing head coverings has been tolerated, does not preclude that, given the increasing number of forgeries detected, it is decided to terminate this tolerance. Finally, he found that the achievement invoked special requirements and rites of the Sikh religion, was not disproportionate to the objective pursued, given especially the ad hoc nature of the obligation to learn to produce a photograph "bare head" and did not that different treatment should be reserved for persons of the Sikh.

By a decision of 3 July 2008, the Administrative Court of Appeal of Versailles overturned the ruling of 14 December 2006.

Grievances

Citing Articles 8 (right to respect for private and family life), 9 (right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion) and 14 (prohibition of discrimination) (combined with Articles 8 and 9) of the European Convention on Human Rights, he believed that the obligation to show "bare head" on the identity photograph driver's license constitutes an infringement of his privacy and his freedom of religion and conscience. He criticized the absence in the regulation issue of different treatment to members of the Sikh community.

Procedure

The motion was brought before the European Court of Human Rights on 11 June 2007.

Decision of the Court

Article 9

The Court recognized that the contested legislation, which requires showing "bare head" on identity photographs of driver's license, constitutes an interference with the right to freedom of religion and conscience, that this interference was prescribed by law and pursued at least one of the legitimate aims listed in the second paragraph of Article 9 of the Convention, namely to ensure public safety.

She recalled that as protects Article 9, freedom of thought, conscience and religion is one of the foundations of a democratic society "under the Convention. According to her, if freedom of religion is primarily a matter of procedure, it also implies that to manifest one's religion individually and privately or collectively, in public and within the circle of those whose faith one shares.

However, according to the Court, Article 9 does not protect any act motivated or inspired by a religion or belief. Moreover, it does not always guarantee the right to behave in a manner dictated by a religious belief and does not give individuals doing so the right to evade rules that have proved justified.

Thus, she recalled that neither the obligation of a Muslim student to submit a photograph of identity "bare head" for issuing a university degree or the obligation for a person to remove his turban or her veil during security checks at airports or in an enclosure consular constitute a violation of the right to freedom of religion.

In this case, the Court observes that the picture of identity with "bare head" affixed to the license, is necessary for the authorities responsible for public security and protection of public order, particularly in the context checks carried out in connection with the traffic, to identify the driver and ensure their right to drive the vehicle. She stressed that such controls are necessary for public safety within the meaning of Article 9 § 2.

The Court considers that the modalities for implementing such controls are in the discretion of the respondent State, and particularly as the requirement to remove his turban for that purpose or, initially, to establish the license, is a measure. The Court concludes that the interference issue was justified in principle and proportionate to the objective.

Articles 8 and 14 in conjunction with Articles 8 and 9

The Court found no apparent violation of the provisions invoked.

It therefore declared the application inadmissible unanimously.

That decision is now available on the website of the Court (http://www.echr.coe.int). Actual text at here

Press contacts

  • Adrien Raif-Meyer (phone: 00 33 (0) 3 88 41 33 37)
  • Tracey Turner-Tretz (phone: 00 33 (0) 3 88 41 35 30)
  • Sania Ivedi (phone: 00 33 (0) 3 90 21 59 45)

The European Court of Human Rights was established in Strasbourg by the Council of Europe in 1959 for alleged violations of the European Convention on Human Rights of 1950.

1 Prepared by the Registry, this summary does not bind the Court.


Original in French

COUR EUROPÉENNE DES DROITS DE L’HOMME 845 27.11.2008

Communiqué du Greffier

DÉCISION D’IRRECEVABILITÉ MANN SINGH c. FRANCE

Une chambre de la Cour européenne des droits de l’homme a déclaré irrecevable la requête dans l’affaire Mann Singh c. France (requête no 24479/07). (La décision n’existe qu’en français.)

Le requérant

Le requérant, Shingara Mann Singh, est un ressortissant français né en 1956 (qui a 52 ans) et résidant à Sarcelles (France).

Résumé des faits

L’affaire est relative à l’obligation faite d’apparaître « tête nue et de face » sur les photographies destinées au permis de conduire et, en conséquence, l’interdiction faite à un sikh pratiquant d’apparaître avec son turban sur les photos d’identité destinées à être apposées sur son permis de conduire.

Le requérant est sikh pratiquant. La religion sikhe exige de ses membres de porter le turban en permanence. Titulaire d’un permis de conduire pour véhicules ordinaires et poids lourds, le requérant obtint le renouvellement de son permis de conduire pour la dernière catégorie de véhicules en 1987, 1992 et 1998 en produisant des photographies d’identité où il apparaissait coiffé du turban.

Victime d’un vol à main armée au cours duquel son permis de conduire fut dérobé, le requérant demanda la délivrance d’un duplicata du document auprès de la préfecture du Val d’Oise le 30 avril 2004. Sa demande fut refusée au motif qu’il apparaissait coiffé d’un turban sur les photographies d’identité produites.

Le 25 octobre 2004, le requérant réitéra sa demande par écrit auprès de la préfecture, demande qui fut rejetée le 26 novembre 2004 pour le même motif.

Le 24 janvier 2005, le requérant saisit le tribunal administratif de Cergy-Pontoise en vue de faire annuler la décision du 26 novembre 2004 et d’obtenir de la préfecture la délivrance du duplicata sous astreinte.

Le 27 janvier 2005, il saisit également le tribunal d’une requête en référé demandant la suspension de l’exécution de la décision litigieuse.

Par une ordonnance du 11 février 2005, le juge des référés rejeta sa demande. Le 28 février 2005, le requérant se pourvut en cassation contre ladite ordonnance. Par un arrêt du 5 décembre 2005, le Conseil d’Etat annula l’ordonnance et suspendit la décision litigieuse, estimant qu’elle manquait de base légale en ce qu’elle s’appuyait sur une circulaire du 21 juin 1999 relative à l’apposition de photographies d’identité sur les documents d’identité et de voyage, les titres de séjour et les permis de conduire prise par le ministère de l’Intérieur, autorité incompétente pour instaurer une telle obligation pour la délivrance de permis de conduire. Le Conseil d’Etat ordonna à la préfecture du Val d’Oise de réexaminer la demande du requérant.

Le 6 décembre 2005, le ministre des Transports, de l’Equipement, du Tourisme et de la Mer adressa aux préfets une circulaire no 2005-80 relative à l’apposition de photographies d’identité sur les permis de conduire, prescrivant la production d’une photographie sur laquelle la tête de la personne devait être « nue et de face » pour la délivrance du document ou d’un duplicata.

Le 16 janvier 2006, après réexamen de la situation du requérant, la préfecture du Val d’Oise rendit une décision lui refusant de nouveau la délivrance de duplicata du permis de conduire en se fondant sur la nouvelle circulaire.

Le 6 février 2006, le requérant et l’association « United Sikhs» saisirent le Conseil d’Etat d’un recours pour excès de pouvoir aux fins d’annulation de la circulaire du 6 décembre 2005, et d’une requête en référé visant à la suspension de son exécution.

Par une ordonnance du 6 mars 2006, le Conseil d’Etat rejeta leur demande en référé.

Le 15 mars 2006, le requérant saisit le tribunal administratif de Cergy-Pontoise en vue de faire annuler la décision du 16 janvier 2006 lui refusant la délivrance du duplicata du permis de conduire et d’obtenir de la préfecture la délivrance du document.

Par un jugement du 14 décembre 2006, le tribunal administratif joignit les requêtes visant à annuler les décisions de refus des 26 novembre 2004 et 16 janvier 2006, annula lesdites décisions et ordonna à la préfecture de réexaminer la demande du requérant. Le ministre des Transports, de l’Equipement, du Tourisme et de la Mer interjeta appel du jugement concernant la décision de refus du 16 janvier 2006 devant la cour administrative d’appel de Versailles. Par ailleurs, sa demande n’ayant pas été réexaminée par la préfecture, le requérant saisit la cour administrative d’appel d’une demande d’aide à l’exécution du jugement du 14 décembre 2006, demande qui fut rejetée.

Par un arrêt du 15 décembre 2006, le Conseil d’Etat rejeta le recours pour excès de pouvoir à l’encontre de la circulaire du 6 décembre 2005 en estimant que les dispositions contestées, qui visent à limiter les risques de fraude ou de falsification des permis de conduire, en permettant une identification par le document en cause aussi certaine que possible de la personne qu’il représente, ne sont ni inadaptées ni disproportionnées par rapport à cet objectif. Il ajouta que la circonstance que, par le passé, la production de photographies avec port de couvre-chef ait été tolérée, ne faisait pas obstacle à ce que, face à l’augmentation du nombre de falsifications constatées, il soit décidé de mettre fin à cette tolérance. Enfin, il jugea que l’atteinte particulière invoquée aux exigences et aux rites de la religion sikhe, n’était pas disproportionnée au regard de l’objectif poursuivi, compte-tenu notamment du caractère ponctuel de l’obligation faite de se découvrir afin de produire une photographie « tête nue », et n’impliquait pas qu’un traitement différent aurait dû être réservé aux personnes de confession sikhe.

Par un arrêt du 3 juillet 2008, la cour administrative d’appel de Versailles annula le jugement du 14 décembre 2006.

Griefs

Invoquant les articles 8 (droit au respect de la vie privée et familiale), 9 (droit à la liberté de pensée, de conscience et de religion) et 14 (interdiction de la discrimination) (combiné avec les articles 8 et 9) de la Convention européenne des droits de l’homme, le requérant estimait que l’obligation d’apparaître « tête nue » sur la photographie d’identité du permis de conduire constitue une atteinte à sa vie privée, ainsi qu’à sa liberté de religion et de conscience. Il dénonçait l’absence, dans la règlementation litigieuse, de traitement différent réservé aux membres de la communauté sikhe.

Procédure

La requête a été introduite devant la Cour européenne des droits de l’homme le 11 juin 2007.

Décision de la Cour1

Article 9

La Cour a reconnu que la réglementation litigieuse, qui exige d’apparaître « tête nue » sur les photographies d’identité du permis de conduire, est constitutive d’une ingérence dans l’exercice du droit à la liberté de religion et de conscience, que cette ingérence était prévue par la loi et qu’elle poursuivait au moins un des buts légitimes énumérés au second paragraphe de l’article 9 de la Convention, à savoir garantir la sécurité publique.

Elle a rappelé que, telle que la protège l’article 9, la liberté de pensée, de conscience et de religion représente l’une des assises d’une « société démocratique » au sens de la Convention. Selon elle, si la liberté de religion relève d’abord du for intérieur, elle implique également celle de manifester sa religion individuellement et en privé, ou de manière collective, en public et dans le cercle de ceux dont on partage la foi.

Toutefois, selon la Cour, l’article 9 ne protège pas n’importe quel acte motivé ou inspiré par une religion ou conviction. De plus, il ne garantit pas toujours le droit de se comporter d’une manière dictée par une conviction religieuse et ne confère pas aux individus agissant de la sorte le droit de se soustraire à des règles qui se sont révélées justifiées.

Ainsi, elle a rappelé que ni l’obligation faite à un étudiant de confession musulmane de présenter une photographie d’identité « tête nue » aux fins de délivrance d’un diplôme universitaire, ni l’obligation faite à une personne de retirer son turban ou son voile lors de contrôles de sécurité aux aéroports ou dans une enceinte consulaire ne constituent une atteinte à l’exercice du droit à la liberté de religion.

Dans la présente affaire, la Cour relève que la photographie d’identité avec « tête nue », apposée sur le permis de conduire, est nécessaire aux autorités chargées de la sécurité publique et de la protection de l’ordre public, notamment dans le cadre de contrôles effectués en relation avec les dispositions du code de la route, pour identifier le conducteur et s’assurer de son droit à conduire le véhicule concerné. Elle souligne que de tels contrôles sont nécessaires à la sécurité publique au sens de l’article 9 § 2.

La Cour estime que les modalités de la mise en œuvre de tels contrôles entrent dans la marge d’appréciation de l’Etat défendeur, et ce d’autant plus que l’obligation de retirer son turban à cette fin ou, initialement, pour faire établir le permis de conduire, est une mesure ponctuelle. La Cour en conclut que l’ingérence litigieuse était justifiée dans son principe et proportionnée à l’objectif visé.

Articles 8 et 14 combiné avec les articles 8 et 9

La Cour n’a relevé aucune apparence de violation des dispositions invoquées.

Elle a donc déclaré la requête irrecevable à l’unanimité.

Contacts pour la presse

  • Adrien Raif-Meyer (téléphone : 00 33 (0)3 88 41 33 37)
  • Tracey Turner-Tretz (téléphone : 00 33 (0)3 88 41 35 30)
  • Sania Ivedi (téléphone : 00 33 (0)3 90 21 59 45)

La Cour européenne des droits de l’homme a été créée à Strasbourg par les Etats membres du Conseil de l’Europe en 1959 pour connaître des allégations de violation de la Convention européenne des droits de l’homme de 1950.

81 Rédigé par le greffe, ce résumé ne lie pas la Cour.


See also

External links